Staffing is at forefront of QACPS special ed program

Queen Anne’s County Public Schools is currently recruiting for four new positions in the special education program. The new positions include three teaching positions and one teaching specialist. With adequate staffing an ongoing concern for all programs in QACPS, staffing in the special education program has been provided to meet the needs of all students, according to school officials; and overall, the population of students receiving special education services has declined in recent years. Students are also supported by the Mid-Shore Special Education Consortium, a collaborative effort to support students in Queen Anne’s, Caroline, Talbot and Dorchester counties. (East. Shore)

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The ACLU Is Suing Prince George’s County Over Summer School Fees. A Judge Wants A Different Approach

A judge in Prince George’s County asked the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland to consider an alternative approach to its lawsuit against the county school board over student fees for required summer school. Circuit Court Judge John Davey suggested the ACLU ask its clients whether they should instead take their complaint to the Maryland State Board of Education. The ACLU sued the county schools in June for charging a $225 fee for students to take required graduation courses. (WAMU)

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Former Ashburton Elementary Teacher Pleads Guilty To Possessing Child Porn

A former Ashburton Elementary School physical education teacher pleaded guilty on Thursday to possessing child pornography but, as part of a plea agreement, he will not face any jail time. Daemon Alan Dartouzos, 55, of Germantown, was arrested in April and charged with 10 counts of possessing child pornography after a two-year FBI investigation, but Dartouzos agreed to a deal with prosecutors to plead guilty to one count and have the rest dismissed. (Bethesda)

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University of Maryland School of Medicine set to train more doctors for rural areas

The University of Maryland School of Medicine will receive $750,000 in federal funds to train more doctors for posts in rural areas, where the growing nationwide shortage of doctors is most acute. The money, announced Thursday at the Baltimore school, comes from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. It’s part of a $20 million award that will be made over a three-year period to develop rural residency programs across the country. (Balt. Sun)

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Morgan State to evaluate new round of cannabis business license applications

A team from Morgan State University has been selected to evaluate a new round of medical cannabis grower and processor license applications. The Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission opened applications for a set of additional state cannabis business licenses in March. The new licenses were created in response to a bill that was passed during the 2018 legislative session that called for the creation of 20 new pre-approved operating licenses for medical marijuana businesses, and for special consideration of ownership diversity in awarding the licenses. (Balt. Bus. Journal) 

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Maryland education dept. faulted for failing to adequately protect student, teacher info

An audit of Maryland’s education department is faulting the agency for failing to protect what should be confidential student and teacher information stored in databases that should also be confidential. The database includes names and Social Security numbers for more than 1.4 million students and more than 233,000 teachers. The state is stressing that none of the data was actually compromised. Many of the faults found in the Office of Legislative Audits review focused on technology. The audit said the databases containing that information were not adequately protected and that the information was often left in “clear text” in those databases. (WTOP)

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Meeting the Future of Higher Education

Hrabowski was standing next to University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) President Jay A. Perman, MD, inside UMB’s Community Engagement Center (CEC). Together, they welcomed 26 Baltimore middle school students and nine presidents of higher education institutions to the Inside Higher Education (IHE) student-president meet and greet on July 8. The event which was co-sponsored by UMB and UMBC served as an informal occasion for the students to “speed network” by talking to university and college presidents from across the country. In small groups, the students were able to ask questions and talk about their goals with each of the presidents in 20-minute increments.

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In D.C., 5,500 students are homeless. The city is helping some of them take their first steps to college.

His bed was snugly made, and four pair of sneakers formed a neat line beneath his extra-long twin bed. An iron that Dajon Duvall borrowed from his dorm’s residential adviser sat on a wooden desk that was crammed on his side of the room. Every day, the 18-year-old irons his T-shirts and jeans, a habit he picked up in eighth grade after spending two years living with his mom and younger sisters in hotel rooms in central Florida. The routine endured, even as Duvall bounced from house to house throughout his childhood. Each morning this summer, he ironed before grabbing a quick breakfast of Quaker oatmeal and racing off to class with his professors at American University. (Wash. Post)

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