Anne Arundel Board of Education adds $10.9 million to schools budget

The Board of Education of Anne Arundel County approved an operating budget request Wednesday, but not before adding nearly 52 positions and $10.9 million to the superintendent’s recommendation. Seven members voted to approve the request for the $1.2 billion budget — District 33’s Eric Grannon voted against the approval and District 32 representative Sidney Butcher abstained. A $216 million capital budget request to pay for construction projects was approved unanimously. (Capital)

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Worcester school board signs off proposed budget

The Worcester County Board of Education adopted a proposed $108.3 million budget for the coming year. On Tuesday the school board voted 6-0 to adopt a proposed budget of $108,262,987, which represents a 3.34 percent increase over the current year’s spending plan. Increases come in the areas of health insurance, salaries and capital projects. (Dispatch)

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Carroll Community College proposes $2 per credit tuition increase

The Carroll Community College board of trustees approved a $2 per credit hour, or 1.5 percent, increase in tuition for next year, an increase that matches what was approved last year, and one that is lower than that of previous years. Last year, the board originally approved a budget that included a $6 per credit hour, or 4.5 percent, tuition increase, but the following month voted to reduce the recommended tuition increase to 1.5 percent following Gov. Larry Hogan’s request to keep tuition increases at 2 percent or less. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Anne Arundel sheriff calls for bulletproof doors, metal detectors at all schools

Anne Arundel County Sheriff Ron Bateman called Thursday for metal detectors, bulletproof doors and X-ray machines at all county schools, suggesting the measures as a response to the shooting at a Florida high school that killed 17 people last week. Bateman, whose agency has no role in providing security for county schools, used social media to outline five changes he wants to see implemented as soon as possible. (Capital)

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Local campaigns aim to help Baltimore students see 'Black Panther'

Aaron Maybin, the NFL linebacker-turned-art teacher who drew national attention to the city’s cold schools after posting a picture online of his students huddled in coats in a classroom, is looking to start another campaign to benefit his students. Maybin, an educator at Matthew A. Henson Elementary School in West Baltimore, said on Twitter that he’s “trying to organize taking every kid at my school to see a showing of Black Panther” — Marvel Studios’ latest blockbuster film featuring a black superhero from a comic series first released in 1966. (Balt. Sun)

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A high-school student, a loaded gun, and a ‘list of grievances’ that might not exist

The day after a mass school shooting in Florida, Alwin Chen alarmed officials at his Maryland school. The 18-year-old, police say, showed up at Clarksburg High School, north of Washington, with a loaded gun in his book bag on Feb. 15. To add to the fright, prosecutors said repeatedly in court on Tuesday that Chen had made a list. “He had a list of grievances against students at the school,” a prosecutor said. Now, attorneys for the young man say there was no such list. (Wash. Post)

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'Enough is enough': Hundreds of students travel from Maryland to the U.S. Capitol to protest gun violence

Daniel Gelillo had just returned home from school when the news flashed on his TV screen. It had happened again. A gunman had walked into classrooms and opened fire, this time in Florida. “When the videos of the shooting from inside the school came out, the first thing I said was, ‘Enough is enough,’ ” said the senior from Richard Montgomery High School in Rockville, Md. Gelillo took to Facebook and called on other Montgomery County students to leave school Wednesday morning and venture to the U.S. Capitol to rally for legislation that would aim to curb gun violence. (Wash. Post)

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Montgomery County Superintendent weighs in on Wednesday’s student protests in D.C., threats against schools

Schools Superintendent Jack Smith on Thursday addressed an array of student safety issues, from the walkouts this week to the increase in threats since last week's shooting at a Florida high school. Smith wrote in a letter to the community that Montgomery County Public Schools supports all of the students who have turned to activism and civic engagement in the wake of the Parkland school shooting. But he also highlighted the safety risks in leaving school property for demonstrations, such as the protest that drew hundreds of MCPS high schoolers to the U.S. Capitol during class time on Wednesday. (Bethesda)

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