Hogan willing to spend $100 million to settle HBCU lawsuit against Maryland

Gov. Larry Hogan said he is open to spending as much as $100 million to settle a lawsuit brought by a coalition of historically black colleges in Maryland, signaling his desire to end a legal battle that has dragged on for more than a decade. In a letter to Del. Cheryl D. Glenn, chair of the state’s legislative black caucus, the governor’s chief legal counsel, Robert Scholz, said Hogan is willing to discuss using those funds to supplement the state’s support for HBCUs over a 10-year period. (Balt. Sun)

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Committee hears proposals for community college tuition aid

Giavanna Tserkis choked up as she told state legislators how she had to work three jobs to put herself through college. Tserkis testified before the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee on Wednesday in support of a measure that would provide free tuition to some Maryland community college students. (News-Post)

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Morgan State's president secures new 5-year contract

Morgan State University President David Wilson has secured a new five-year contract, following a unanimous vote from the school's Board of Regents. Wilson took the helm at Morgan State in July 2010 as the Baltimore institution's 10th president. The new contract will extend his term until 2023. Under the new agreement, Wilson will receive a 3 percent increase, bringing his annual salary to $445,737, along with a deferred compensation retirement plan. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Baltimore County executive approves building a new Dulaney High School

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz on Wednesday committed to building a new Dulaney High School, switching his position after years of opposing such a move. Kamenetz originally wanted to renovate the school, but parents of students who attend the school called for an entire new building and said the renovation would not be enough to give the school the updates it needed. (Balt. Sun)

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First Anne Arundel school board members file for election — a complicated first

Last week the president and vice president of the Anne Arundel County school board filed for election. President Julie Hummer wants schools to continue providing excellence through equity. Vice President Terry Gilleland wants to continue advocating for the taxpayers. This will be the first Board of Education elections in the county, and things are getting complicated. (Capital)

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Anne Arundel school board votes to support calendar-altering legislation

Wednesday the Board of Education of Anne Arundel County voted to support a state bill that would require public schools to close on or before the third Friday of June, rather than June 15. A 2016 executive order issued by Gov. Larry Hogan mandated that school should start no earlier than the Tuesday after Labor Day, and that school should end no later than June 15. (Capital)

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Officials seek help for YouthWorks

 

Baltimore city's summer jobs program YouthWorks has already received more than 12,000 applications so far. Each year the program matches thousands of city youth to five week summer jobs throughout the city. Last year YouthWorks put 8,900 people to work. With the number of applicants up, the mayor is asking more businesses to help the program. (WMAR-TV)

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Carroll Community College students head to Annapolis to advocate for education

For Westminster resident Marta Cruz-Alicea, Carroll Community College is providing a second chance. Cruz-Alicea is a nontraditional student at the school. She’s 40, a mother of three teenagers and she already has a college degree in journalism. But, Cruz-Alicea had a different dream she wanted to pursue. “I always wanted to be a nurse since I had cancer,” said Cruz-Alicea, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma at 17. And Carroll Community College is helping her do just that. (Carr. Co. Times)

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