Hopkins students and faculty walk out of class to protest university's contracts with ICE

Students and faculty at the Johns Hopkins University walked out of class Wednesday morning to protest the school’s contracts with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. Around 150 students marched around campus chanting “Caging children is horrific. JHU is complicit” and “JHU hear us shout. We won’t stop until ICE is out.” It was the fourth time the group “Hopkins Coalition Against ICE” had organized an action against the contracts. The complaints began last July when Drew Daniel, an associate professor and director of graduate studies in the university’s English department, created an online petition calling on the university to end the contracts. (Balt. Sun)

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In school water fountains, how much lead is too much?

A Montgomery County Council member is taking aim at lead levels in school bubblers and water faucets, advancing legislation this week to reduce the permissible level of the harmful metal that children can be exposed to in drinking water at schools. Council member Tom Hucker’s bill, introduced Tuesday, would lower the acceptable amount of lead to no more than 5 parts per billion (ppb). Water fixtures texting higher than that would have to be fixed or replaced. While the county currently follows the state standard of 20 ppb, many experts say that level is too lax. (Wash. Post)

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Anne Arundel school board elects student member as vice president, a first; Gilleland is new president

The Anne Arundel County school board elected Josie Urrea, 18, to serve as the body’s vice president, making her the first student member to serve in the position. Urrea narrowly won her seat. Six of her colleagues voted for her, she needed five for approval. “I have been an advocate for education since middle school,” Urrea said. “Although I have the word ‘student’ in front of my position, I am an equal board member in voice, vote and value. I hope to be judged by the integrity of my thoughts and actions, not my youth.” (Capital)

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Harford's first Pledge Program students vow not to use drugs, help friends, family to be drug-free

Nine-year-old Sydney Heister used to worry that someone might pressure her to try drugs and that she’d take a little bit of it. “But I’m not going to,” Sydney said Tuesday. “Because I don’t want to end up having a bad life and I want to play sports and get a job when I’m older.” Sydney, a fourth-grader at Youth’s Benefit Elementary School in Fallston, and her older brother, Aidan, 11, a fifth-grader, were among the first class to graduate from the Pledge Program through the Harford County Sheriff’s Office and Office of Drug Control Policy. (Aegis)

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New look, new name? Why there’s a push to change the name of a Montgomery Co. middle school

A Montgomery County Council member is asking the school system to change the name of a Silver Spring, Maryland, middle school. Council President Nancy Navarro, who previously served on the county’s school board, has asked school Superintendent Jack Smith to rename Col. E Brooke Lee Middle School. At first glance, it may seem perfectly understandable why Col. E Brooke Lee — who died in 1984 at the age of 91 — has a middle school named after him. He had family members who signed the Declaration of Independence. Some served in both Congress and the Maryland State House. (WTOP)

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Carroll County school counselors use collaboration to serve students

Over at Manchester Elementary, students and teachers will notice more citrusy decor because counselor Gwen Furano chose to focus on the classic advice to make lemons into lemonade for the week. In school counselor’s terms, this is an example of growth mindset — the idea that work and perseverance — a skill for students that she has focused on in the school for about three years. (Carr. Co. Times)

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Maryland students still earn high AP test scores, but fall in ranks as other states catch up

Maryland fell again in the national rankings of success on Advanced Placement exams, as a record number of students participated in AP programs. The state now ranks at No. 4 in its percentage of public high schoolers who score a 3 or higher on AP exams, according to a new report from College Board. Maryland had dropped to No. 2 in the Class of 2016 report, after a seven-year run at the top of the national ranks. It held onto that No. 2 spot for 2017, before falling another two spots in the Class of 2018 report. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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Parents, teachers, administrators urge Baltimore County school board to fight to fund students' needs

In a rare show of unity at the Baltimore County school board meeting Tuesday night, dozens of parents, teachers and administrators encouraged the school board to ask for what students need rather than the slimmed-down budget that meets the county executive’s fiscal limits. A revision to the budget proposal two weeks ago has been criticized for its failure to provide pay raises for school employees and for not providing the schools with enough teachers at a time when enrollment is increasing. (Balt. Sun)

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