County departments merged to create Harford County Office of Community and Economic Development; Parrish named director

County Executive Barry Glassman issued an executive order Wednesday consolidating two county departments to create the Harford County Office of Community and Economic Development. The new office will improve efficiencies and strengthen opportunities for business development and community stability with a focus on jobs, transportation, and housing. Effective immediately, Leonard Parrish, Harford County’s director of Housing and Community Development will become acting director of the new office, which merges his department with the county’s Office of Economic Development. (Dagger)

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Baltimore bike lane construction delayed again, amid fire code concerns

Baltimore bicyclists may have to wait nearly another year for protected bike lanes on Monument, Centre and Madison streets. The city’s Board of Estimates approved a 318-day extension on Wednesday — a move that frustrated bike advocates. The vote allows the city to delay for a second time construction on the Downtown Bike Network to reconfigure the lanes to maintain 20-foot street clearance for fire department vehicles. (Balt. Sun)

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Officer injured, two in custody in shooting incident near NSA security gate

Two people were in federal custody Wednesday, and three people were recovering from injuries after authorities said the driver of a rented sport utility vehicle tried to enter a secured area of the top-secret National Security Agency. Authorities quickly concluded the incident was not terrorism. In late afternoon, an FBI spokesman said one theory being investigated is whether the driver mistakenly turned onto a restricted parkway exit and panicked when he saw heavily armed police. (Wash. Post)

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Planning Commission endorses Frederick County transportation priorities

 

From road construction and transit improvements to pedestrian and bicycle projects, Frederick County’s list of transportation priorities has the endorsement of the county’s Planning Commission. The county’s priorities are outlined in a draft letter to Transportation Secretary Pete Rahn, asking for them to be considered in the development of the state’s Consolidated Transportation Plan for fiscal 2019 through fiscal 2024. (News-Post)

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5.7 million gallons of sewage flows into Baltimore's waterways

They say it never rains but it pours, and in Baltimore, every time it pours, raw sewage is released into the waterways. On Sunday, around 5.7 million gallons of wastewater mixed with rainwater poured into the Jones Falls, and 36,000 gallons overflowed into the Western Run, according to the Baltimore Department of Public Works. Angela Haren, director of advocacy for Blue Water Baltimore, calls it a threat to public health. (Balt. Sun)

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BWI Airport getting new snow vehicle

 

Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport is purchasing a specialized snow vehicle that will ensure safe airline flight arrivals in poor winter weather conditions. The Maryland Board of Public Works last week approved the procurement of a 2017 Prinoth Husky, which is a snow grooming vehicle commonly used for smoothing ski slopes. (WMAR-TV)

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Berlin likely to budget funds for parking study

As residents continue to express concerns regarding parking and accessibility in Berlin, officials say they’re working to find a solution. At Monday’s meeting of the Berlin Town Council, Councilman Zack Tyndall told his peers he’d heard from residents worried about the accessibility of certain streets in town during special events. He said that when vehicles were parked on both sides of certain streets, emergency vehicles could have trouble accessing certain neighborhoods. (Dispatch)

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February 14 // 'Nobody is off limits': Baltimore's new inspector general says she'll root out waste and fraud

Just days into the job, Baltimore’s new inspector general says she plans to reinvigorate the office and hire more staff to scrutinize city practices for waste and fraud. “Nobody is off limits,” said Isabel Cumming, 55, who is the city’s first female inspector general. “We can really save some money for the city of Baltimore,” Cumming said. “Overtime situations, theft of time. Purchase cards. There are so many areas that need to be looked at. I love going after white-collar criminals.” (Balt. Sun)

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