In the 1970s, John Apostol faced issues that still confront Annapolis mayors

A nifty remark attributed to Mark Twain — there’s no evidence he actually said it — is “History doesn’t repeat itself but it often rhymes.” For instance: As their new mayor, Annapolis voters pick a pleasant younger professional who hasn’t held elective office before. He’s a Republican from a Greek-American immigrant family associated with a popular city restaurant. He attributes his win to advocacy for limited growth. While in office he wrestles with that issue, as well as historic preservation and major budget difficulties. You might think we’re talking about a recent former mayor. But it’s a description of John Apostol, who died last week at his family’s home in Georgia at age 79. (Capital)

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Pete Smith: I want to go on working for the residents of District 1

I work for them. Four simple words, but a reminder over the last three years of who I represent and the power that the citizens of District 1 have. Almost four years ago, I entered the arena of the County Council and pledged to work on three items: education, public safety and small business. These principles were the foundation of my platform and the motivation for me to serve every day. I pride myself on serving others with hard work, sincerity and integrity. Since the beginning of my term, my record has spoken to efforts to strengthen these pillars. I am even prouder that I have supported these efforts without increasing the burden on the citizens of our county. (Capital)

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Cricket Goodall: Horse industry boosts Md. year round, not just at Preakness time

For more than 250 years, horses have played a vital role in Maryland’s culture, spirit and history, going back to 1743, when the Maryland Jockey Club — the oldest sporting organization in North America — was chartered. Just a few years later, George Washington raced his horses in the streets of Annapolis in the 1750s. And roughly 120 years after that, the first Preakness Stakes was held at Pimlico in 1875. Since then, the second stop of the Triple Crown has put Maryland at the center of horse racing every spring, but it’s important to remember that the state’s horse industry makes measurable impacts on our environment and economy throughout the year. (Balt. Sun)

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Jimmy DeButts: Maryland leaders fumbled sports betting opportunity

“Steps should be taken now to set the stage to immediately launch sports wagering operations (or derail the practice, if that's what voters want). Other states, such as New Jersey, are light years ahead of Maryland. But it's not too late to catch up.” — Jimmy DeButts, March 18, 2017. Surprise! Once again Maryland is caught flatfooted. Advice ignored is money down the drain. Let’s be clear, there isn’t anything the Maryland General Assembly likes more than spending money. So, it’s awfully disheartening when legislation that would enrich the state coffers is ignored one year and kicked down the road the next. (Capital)

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May 15 // Maryland took a step to protect vulnerable, young lives. Other states should follow suit.

With Gov. Larry Hogan's signature on a bill, Maryland last week joined Washington and New York as one of the few states requiring insurance companies to be more diligent before insuring the lives of children. Like those states, Maryland was spurred to act by a high-profile instance of a child killed for insurance money. It should not take the murder of a child to wake lawmakers to the need to act on this issue. Other states now should follow Maryland’s lead to protect vulnerable, young lives. (Wash. Post)

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With Supreme Court sports betting decision, Maryland will be behind the curve on gambling again. That's not such a big deal.

Maryland was behind most of its neighboring states in legalizing slot machines and table games, leading to years of hand-wringing about Marylanders’ money flying across the border to casinos in Delaware, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. This year, the House of Delegates — yes, the same body that blocked slots for years — took action to see that didn’t happen again. Just in case the Supreme Court struck down a 1992 law prohibiting sports betting, the House voted overwhelmingly to put a referendum on November’s ballot to authorize it here. But this time, it was the Senate that quietly killed the idea. (Balt. Sun)

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Attempt to make county waters a no-discharge zone worth trying

If the issue is never at the top of the environmental agenda, it never entirely goes away. Our stories on it extend back at least 30 years. Every so often there is a push to expand “no-discharge zones” — that is, local waters where boaters are not allowed to jettison treated waste. The latest effort, backed by Annapolis Mayor Gavin Buckley and the county, has the Back Creek Nature Conservancy drafting an application to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. If granted, it would make all Anne Arundel County waters — excepting boundary waters on the Patuxent River and Curtis Creek — into no-discharge zones. (Capital)

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Dan Rodricks: I can't see how De Sousa survives this

Maybe I’m missing something, but I don’t see how Mayor Catherine Pugh can keep Darryl De Sousa as police commissioner of Baltimore. She should start considering candidates to succeed him. I am stuck on this: The mayor last week suspended De Sousa with pay “pending resolution of this matter” — the matter being federal misdemeanor charges that the commissioner willfully failed to file income tax returns for 2013, 2014 and 2015. How could this possibly end well? Even if, for some reason, the feds were to drop the charges, De Sousa already admitted in a tweet that he failed to do what millions of Americans know they must do every April. (Balt. Sun)

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