Ditanya Rosebud: Marylanders need a raise – but our representatives have failed us

Workers in Maryland need a raise. I am a lifelong Baltimore resident and in my 44 years I have never seen working people struggle as much as they do now. I see seniors working because they can’t afford their prescription medication or their rent. I watch too many people working and still needing help. It’s crazy that you can work so hard and still need help. We need a higher minimum wage so that we can stay in our homes, raise our children, and retire with dignity. (Md. Matters)

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David A. Plymyer: Police overtime spending violates Baltimore’s charter

At its next meeting on November 19, the City Council will take a final vote on whether to approve a “supplementary appropriation” of $21 million to the Baltimore Police Department. Monday's preliminary vote in favor of the appropriation was a disappointing exercise by a Council that had once showed promise as a reform-minded body. The supplementary appropriation in question covers the costs of police overtime during FY (fiscal year) 2018 that were in excess of the costs for police overtime appropriated in the city’s budget for FY18, which ended on June 30. (Brew)

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Robert C. Embry Jr.: To stop the killings, Baltimore needs more data

As Baltimoreans seek to address the city’s out of control murder rate, they need more information as to what works and what does not. For example, there is considerable pressure for the Baltimore Police Department to put more police on the street in high crime areas, but the public has no information on the impact of X number of additional police on Y area for Z length of time on gun-related crime. (Balt. Sun)

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Michael Sokolove: The U-Md. debacle is what happens when a university cares about sports above all else

Before the University of Maryland's Board of Regents essentially pushed him out for daring to challenge the football coach, Wallace D. Loh, the school's president, liked to refer to the athletic department as the school's "front porch." In recent years, this has become a kind of a trope of American universities, and I heard about the "front porch" countless times while reporting a new book on the University of Louisville. It is meant to signify that their football and basketball teams will attract interest and engage people from around the nation who might otherwise just pass the place by. (Wash. Post)

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Valerie Strauss: Why three University of Maryland football players are the best teachers of the week

This week, it seems appropriate to make three University of Maryland football players our teachers of the week. Every so often, I pick the best or worst teacher of the week from the pool of public figures whose job it is to serve as role models for young people. This week, it was the young people on the College Park campus who taught the adults a lesson. These three college students — offensive lineman Ellis McKennie, tight end Avery Edwards and offensive lineman Brendan Moore — took a stand about something when adult leaders of the university failed to do so in rather spectacular fashion. It couldn’t have been easy for them to do, but they did. (Wash. Post)

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November 2 // The University of Maryland can — and must — recover from this week's debacle. Here's how.

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Josh Kurtz: The Franchot Factor

Halloween just passed, so it’s fair to ask: Is state Comptroller Peter V.R. Franchot (D) merely masquerading as a Democrat? Franchot’s third term as the state’s tax collector has been defined, more than anything, by his buddy-buddy relationship with Gov. Lawrence J. Hogan Jr. (R) and his growing estrangement from the state’s Democratic establishment – or “the Annapolis machine,” as he likes to call it. More than any other Democrat, Franchot has given cover to Hogan’s favored narrative that he operates in a bipartisan fashion. (Md. Matters)

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Vote ‘Yes’ on Baltimore City Question F

We encourage Baltimore City voters to vote “Yes” on Question F, a Charter Amendment that would create an independent Office of the Inspector General.  Mayor Catherine Pugh and the Baltimore City Council publicly support passage of Question F. The city’s voters need to do their part and pass this ballot measure. Under the ballot measure, the Office of Inspector General would be transformed from a unit supervised by the City Solicitor created by an O’Malley era executive order into an independent unit of city government recognized in the City Charter. (Daily Record)

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