A partnership for hotel, neighbors

Without a doubt, the proposed downtown hotel will be in a symbiotic relationship with the Frederick historic district in which it will be situated. The hotel will revitalize downtown, and the historic district provides a goodly portion of the charm that makes the hotel such an attractive project for the city. (News-Post)

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February 2 // Fake time sheets, fingerprint scanners and the culture at the heart of the Baltimore Police's trust problem

It has come to this: The people whose word prosecutors ask jurors to believe every day to put criminals behind bars cannot be trusted not to lie on their weekly time sheets and so now must scan their fingerprints and the start and end of their shifts. It’s not that we disagree with the Baltimore Police Department’s decision to invest in technology to help prevent fraudulent overtime. Police departments will always need to spend some amount on overtime as they cope with unforeseeable circumstances. But spending nearly a million dollars a week on overtime while still struggling to put enough men and women in uniform on the street is unsustainable; we can’t afford to pay for even a single hour of overtime that isn’t justified. (Balt. Sun)

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Anne Arundel prosecutor should explain decision not to appeal ruling on police coercion

Reasonable people might disagree on what constitutes clever detective work by Anne Arundel County police and what crosses the line into coercion of a murder suspect. County Circuit Court Judge Stacey McCormack, in a Jan. 22 ruling, determined two detectives investigating a 2016 homicide improperly misled Nikko Talley of Glen Burnie into waiving his right to an attorney during questioning. They later charged him with first-degree murder. Police Chief Tim Altomare disagrees. He sees the actions of Detective Jason DiPietro and Detective Kelly Harding during that interrogation as good police work and permissible strategic deception on the part of investigators. (Capital)

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Radley Balko: The jaw-dropping fall of an elite Baltimore police unit validates the need for federal oversight

Back in the summer of 2016, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division released the report from its investigation of the Baltimore Police Department. I wrote at the time that it was one of the worst such reports I’d ever seen. Still is. It described routine harassment and discrimination, habitual violations of constitutional rights, and little to no oversight, transparency or accountability. The report brought a sense of vindication for residents of Baltimore who have long complained about the city’s policing. (Wash. Post)

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Michael Bond: Thanks for everything, Discovery, but we'll be fine

The news that Discovery is leaving Downtown Silver Spring was difficult to hear, but not altogether unexpected. And, while its physical plant looms over the downtown and the loss of 1,300 highly-paid jobs is a serious economic blow, the company and the city have been moving in opposite directions for years. While its renaissance may forever be inexorably linked to it, Silver Spring’s vibrancy is not tied to one company’s fortune. (Wash. Post)

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Laslo Boyd: Donald Trump and the Mitchell Doctrine

Early in the presidency of Richard Nixon, Attorney General John Mitchell responded to a reporter’s question with these words: “Pay attention to what we do, not what we say.”  That’s incredibly good advice for those trying to make sense of the presidency of Donald Trump. His words, particularly when they come in the form of a tweet, are at best a distraction and frequently false or misleading. (fromacertainpointofview)

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Brian Griffiths: Maryland's AG is abusing his office for crass politics

Last week attorneys from the office of Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh appeared in a federal courtroom in Greenbelt. You might think these attorneys would be overseeing important litigation that affected the health, safety and well-being of each and every resident of the state of Maryland. Instead, Frosh had his lawyers launching partisan salvos against the president of the United States. (Capital)

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February 1 // Hogan's State of the State speech was boring. That's its genius.

The biggest astronomical alignment of the week may have been the Super/Blue/Blood moon of Wednesday morning, but a close second, from a Maryland politics perspective at least, was the coincidence of President Donald Trump’s first State of the Union speech Tuesday night and Gov. Larry Hogan’s fourth State of the State on Wednesday afternoon. There was simply no comparison between the two, and surely that’s just what Governor Hogan was aiming for. (Balt. Sun)

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