It's their game

Cumberland’s ongoing negotiations with CSX Transportation over four dilapidated railroad bridges in the city remind us of America’s ongoing disagreements with North Korea and Iran over their nuclear programs: Both have gone on for years without producing much in the way of positive results. The talks differ in that the individuals involved in the Cumberland-CSX affair aren’t nearly as colorful. Also, there actually is a chance — slim as it may be — that something may eventually be accomplished with regard to the bridges. (Times-News)

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We are more concerned about Anne Arundel's views than President Trump's

Today, some 200 news organizations around the nation are calling on President Donald Trump to stop using hateful language that paints journalists as the “enemy of the people.” We realize, because of recent events, there may be wider than normal interest in what we say here today. It’s not that we disagree with concerns about the president’s language in speeches and on social media. We noted with regret the hurtful nature of his remarks last month calling most journalists dishonest even as we attended funerals for five friends and colleagues killed in the June 28 attack on our newsroom. We’re just not coordinating with other news organizations because the president’s opinion, frankly, is just not that important to us. (Capital)

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Ron George: We must stop the next shooter before he strikes

We have now documented enough over several years to note common indicators of the danger at hand and must make an effort to stop many from happening. Jarrod Ramos’ years of threatening behavior should have been documented in a database and action taken including notification to all gun dealers that he cannot be sold a gun. Why wait for a tragedy before taking action? Legislation is needed. (Capital)

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Dan Rodricks: Buses, racists and bridging the Baltimore city-suburban divide

When urban historians tell the story of Baltimore in the years since the Freddie Gray uprising, they’ll have at least three narrative lines to follow: how some institutions, Johns Hopkins University most prominently, doubled-down on their commitment to address the city’s chronic problems; how political leaders, most prominently the Republican governor of Maryland and the Democratic mayors of Baltimore, missed opportunities to summon public will to pull the city out of its tailspin; how the unrest of April 2015, and the three-year surge of violence that followed, deepened the divide between the city and its suburbs. (Balt. Sun)

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David Anderson: Baltimore removed its Confederate monuments a year ago, so what's changed?

As we mark the one-year anniversary of the removal of four monuments here in Baltimore, I am left with a nagging question: Are we any closer to solving the dilemma of how we recognize important historical figures, one that is different than the pervasive white male, figurative representations that dominate America’s landscape? In March of this year, after the removal of the Lee and Jackson monument, Baltimore City public officials came up with a “solution” for this specific site. A tree-lined area close to where the monument once stood was renamed “Harriet Tubman Grove.” While the road to get to this place in time was certainly paved with good intentions, the absence of Harriet Tubman as a figurative depiction is a troubled compromise. (Balt. Sun)

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Steve “Andy” Ellis and Glenn L. Ross: Calling on all legislative candidates to embrace 100 percent renewable energy

On Aug. 7, our competitor in Baltimore City's 45th legislative district, Del. Cheryl D. Glenn (D), published an article in Maryland Matters calling for 50 percent of Maryland's energy to come from clean, safe, and renewable sources by an unspecified date in the future. As Green Party candidates this issue is of particular interest to us. With the dangerous impacts of climate change set to increasingly harm Marylanders – and specifically poor Black, Latinx, Asian, and Native Americans in our state – 50 percent just isn't good enough. We need to pass a 100 percent Renewable Energy Portfolio in the 2019 Maryland General Assembly session, and if elected, we will fight to do just that. (Md. Matters)

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Peter Schmuck: After Jordan McNair's death, why isn't Maryland athletic director Damon Evans on leave, too?

University of Maryland president Wallace D. Loh and athletic director Damon Evans said most of the right things when they faced the media Tuesday afternoon to announce several developments relating to the heatstroke death of football player Jordan McNair. They described a meeting earlier in the day with McNair’s parents during which they apologized and took responsibility for the medical missteps that led to the tragedy and an allegedly flawed football culture. They also announced the formation of an independent panel to investigate the damning allegations about the program revealed first in reporting by ESPN on Saturday. But one big question they did not answer was why Evans is not on administrative leave along with football coach DJ Durkin? (Balt. Sun)

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It's about time Anne Arundel schools tested for lead in drinking water

There is every reason to believe that the threat to health posed by drinking water contaminated by lead in Anne Arundel County Schools is being dealt with in a practical way. County school officials have tested about a quarter of school buildings, and plan to complete the testing when schools resume in the fall. The 2017 state law that required this testing also set the standard that schools must be in session during the testing. (Capital)

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