City, incinerators debate preemption in Clean Air Act case

Baltimore is asking a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit brought by city incinerators over the Baltimore Clean Air Act, arguing the city had the authority to pass the ordinance and was not preempted by state or federal regulations. Passed in February and signed into law in March, Baltimore’s ordinance imposes emissions standards that are intentionally more stringent than state and federal laws. Incinerator operators Wheelabrator Baltimore L.P. and Curtis Bay Energy L.P., as well as a trash removal company and two trade associations, filed suit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore in April arguing the ordinance is illegal and was preempted. (Daily Record)

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With school approaching, Bank of America employees stuffed 1,000 backpacks for Baltimore students

The mood on Sunday afternoon at Oriole Park was largely festive. Families chowed down on hot dogs and hamburgers. Parents looked on as their children played cornhole, got their faces painted and posed for photos with the Oriole Bird. But the hometown team wasn’t playing, and the sudden midafternoon storm didn’t push them out. Instead, while the O’s blew a six-run lead to the Red Sox at Fenway Park, hundreds of Bank of America Greater Maryland employees and their families visited Camden Yards to stuff 1,000 backpacks for Baltimore City Public Schools (BCPSS) students. The service event, which doubled as an employee appreciation day, is part of Bank of America Greater Maryland’s continuing philanthropic work in Baltimore City and the surrounding counties. (Balt. Sun)

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How Do We Get There?

Baltimore missed out on getting Amazon.com's second headquarters. And it also may miss out on hosting a game for the 2026 World Cup. Why? Some blame Baltimore's crime rate, of course. But others say it's because of the city's transportation woes. Long commute times, poor roads and unreliable public transportation make it harder for cities to attract top companies and events. After decades of failed plans and piece-meal approaches there seems to be some reason for optimism as the Maryland Transit Administration works on drawing up the first regional transportation plan for Greater Baltimore since 2002. The plan will create a 25-year vision and set public transportation goals for the region. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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White House pushes back against recession fears, defends trade war

President Donald Trump said Sunday he doesn’t see a recession on the horizon after a volatile week for markets. “I don’t think we’re having a recession,” Trump told reporters. “We’re doing tremendously well. Our consumers are rich. I gave a tremendous tax cut and they’re loaded up with money.” The bond market flashed a signal Wednesday that is normally interpreted as a sign a recession is on the horizon. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note briefly broke below the rate for the 2-year. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 800 points or about 3% as the bond market spooked investors. (CNBC)

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Hospital earns high score on patient satisfaction survey

Over the last several years, the Western Maryland Health System Environmental Services Department has worked hard to increase staff engagement, morale and efficiency. As a result, a milestone was recently achieved that few hospitals the size of the Western Maryland Regional Medical Center can boast about — a score of 80.1 on the yearly Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems, which is a patient satisfaction survey required by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for all hospitals in the United States. (Times-News)

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Pilot Program Allowing Electric Bikes, Scooters on Montgomery Trails Receives Mixed Reviews

A pilot program allowing electric bikes and scooters on county trails is receiving mixed reviews. In May, the Montgomery County Planning Board approved the one-year test program to allow electric bikes and scooters on hard-surface park trails throughout the county. The pilot began June 1 and will run through next summer. During the test, community members may submit comments and concerns to the Planning Board through an online forum. About 55 people had weighed in through mid-August.  Some commenters say the electric vehicles, which can travel up to 20 mph, are a danger to pedestrians, particularly children and the elderly. (Bethesda)

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Baltimore County school sues landscaping firm, alleging it hired a convicted rapist who then raped a worker

A Montessori school in Baltimore County is suing a landscaping company after it hired a convicted rapist who then raped one of the school’s employees, according to a lawsuit filed Friday in Baltimore County Circuit Court. Greenspring Montessori School is suing BrightView Landscapes of Rockville for hiring Allen W. Hicks, a convicted rapist known as the “Landover rapist,” to work on school property. Hicks had been charged with raping six women over six months in 1996 and 1997 and sentenced to 25 years in prison, according to the lawsuit. (Balt. Sun)

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Baltimore Development Corp. seeks help from city employers to craft economic development plan

Colin Tarbert has made creating a detailed, long-term economic plan for the city his "primary priority," and he's looking to the city's largest employers to tell him what's needed to grow business in Baltimore. The new CEO of the Baltimore Development Corp. is embarking on a year-long project that will yield what is known as a CEDS, or a comprehensive economic development strategy, to be released in September 2020. The goal is to form a citywide vision for economic growth that paints a picture of "where we see ourselves in five years," Tarbert said, as well as strategies for getting there. (Balt. Bus. Journal)

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